Jennifer Zepralka joined our Washington D.C. office as a partner, and comes to us from the SEC, where she led the Office of Small Business Policy, working on major rulemakings.  Her insights will prove valuable to clients navigating an increasingly complex regulatory environment.  Jennifer brings a wealth of experience advising companies on compliance, corporate and

The SEC today paused implementation of the climate rules the agency rolled out less than one month ago, in the face of significant legal challenges in numerous federal lawsuits.  The rules would impose substantial disclosure mandates on companies, including concerning the costs of extreme weather events, corporate strategies for addressing climate change, corporate governance procedures

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After much anticipation, on March 6, 2024, the US Securities and Exchange Commission voted to adopt final rules that require reporting by public companies of climate change-related disclosure. While the final rules differ from the SEC’s controversial proposed rules in significant ways

The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) has adopted new rules that require public companies to disclose substantial information about the material impacts of climate-related risks on their business, financial condition, and governance (the “Final Rules”).  The SEC says that “climate-related risks, their impacts, and a public company’s response to those risks can significantly affect

The Securities and Exchange Commission adopted (in a 3-2 vote) final rules requiring disclosures about the material impacts of climate-related risks on their business, financial condition, and governance.

These rules had first been proposed in March 2022.  The SEC adopted the final rules after considering, over a two-year period, some 4,500 unique comment letters from

The SEC announced an open meeting for March 6, 2024 to vote and consider adoption of final climate-related disclosure requirements for public companies. This comes after nearly two years since the SEC first proposed its controversial rules. Based on public statements from SEC representatives, it appears that the SEC will consider rules that do not

The SEC announced late last week that it has abandoned its rulemaking efforts begun last May to compel disclosure of share buyback rationales and data. The turnabout follows an October court ruling that the SEC failed to follow required procedures in adopting the rule and the SEC’s indication in December that it could not cure

It’s well known that the SEC’s pending climate disclosure rule stoked a great deal of debate, particularly concerning the costs and benefits and questions of the SEC’s authority. Equally important are some less dramatic but more profound practical concerns about the rule’s auditing requirements. 

Consider the views on this topic of CohnReznick, a national accounting firm

Mayer Brown’s Larry Cunningham testified today before the House Financial Services Committee at a hearing titled: Oversight of the SEC’s Proposed Climate Disclosure Rule: A Future of Legal Hurdles.

The SEC’s proposed climate risk disclosure rules, which we discussed here have proven to be quite controversial and generated significant comment from market participants.  The SEC is